Varicella-zoster virus infection in children with underlying human immunodeficiency virus infection.

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This article describes a prospective longitudinal study of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children, designed to determine their natural history of VZV infection and possible effects of VZV on the progression of HIV infection. Varicella was usually not a serious acute problem, and it did not seem to precede clinical deterioration. The rate of zoster was high: 70% in children with low levels of CD4+ lymphocytes at the time of development of varicella. It is predicted that immunization with live attenuated varicella vaccine is unlikely to be deleterious to HIV-infected children. Moreover, if they are immunized when they still have relatively normal levels of CD4+ lymphocytes, they may have a lower rate of reactivation of VZV than if they were allowed to develop natural varicella when their CD4+ cell counts have fallen to low levels as a result of progressive HIV infection.

Investigators
Abbreviation
J. Infect. Dis.
Publication Date
1999-11-30
Volume
176
Issue
6
Page Numbers
1496-500
Pubmed ID
9395360
Medium
Print
Full Title
Varicella-zoster virus infection in children with underlying human immunodeficiency virus infection.
Authors
Gershon AA, Mervish N, LaRussa P, Steinberg S, Lo SH, Hodes D, Fikrig S, Bonagura V, Bakshi S